Has FLOW radio lost its way? Wednesday, Apr 30 2008 

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FLOW president of operations Nicole Jolly and program director Wayne Williams.
Seven years after it went on-air, Canada’s first urban music station has some listeners wondering if it has forgotten its cultural roots
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Cambodian-Americans are changing their parents’ homeland Wednesday, Apr 30 2008 

18th Street gang Wednesday, Apr 30 2008 

18th Street Gang, also known as Eighteen St., is a Los Angeles-based, largely Hispanic street gang. It is estimated that there are between 10,000 to 20,000 members of the 18th Street gang in Los Angeles County alone. The latest figures from the NDIC put 18th Street membership at 30,000 nationwide, making it one of the biggest street gangs in the country.[1]

History

The 18th Street Gang is one of the largest street gangs in the United States and Mexico. 18th Street originated in the 1960s near 18th Street and Union Avenue in downtown Los Angeles, California The 18th Street gang was created in the late 1960s in the Rampart area of Los Angeles. They have been described as the most violent and aggressive street gang in the country.

Over the past few years, 18th Street grew quickly, but membership levels have appeared to reach a peak in many states.

The 18th Street gang grew out of an older Los Angeles gang, the Clanton 14 street gang (after the street that was their home base), better known as Clanton 14 by locals. In the 1940s, Clanton Street was changed to 14th Place due to the high number of zoot suit Pachucos ‘hanging-out’, as well as the war effort’s need for simple addresses. The Clanton gang was active in Los Angeles for decades and comprised several generations of well-established Mexicans living in America; more recent Mexican immigrants and Chicanos that wanted to join Clanton were rejected. From these rejects the 18th Street gang was born.

The gang has since grown to be California’s most fragmented and largest street gang, with membership in the tens of thousands and many satellite gangs. Out of this, it is estimated that about 60% of its members are illegal immigrants, according to a confidential report last year by the state’s California Department of Justice|Department of Justice.[2] While the majority of the gang’s activities occur in Los Angeles, the gang is active throughout the United States and other countries, including Canada, Mexico.

The gang is divided into five subsets or ‘sides’: North, East, South, West and South Central Los Angeles . Furthermore, each side has its own cliques or mini gangs. 18th Street gangsters are traditionally rivals with the Mara Salvatrucha. Other rivals include Florencia 13, 38th Street Gang, Temple Street 13, Clanton 14, Madrid, and the Black P. Stones (Jungles). The gang was recently documented in Gangsters from 18 shown on the Crime Investigation Network.

The gang was featured in an episode of Numb3rs, in which they were named the 18th Street Mexicali. The gang was also referred to in an episode of Shark as the 18th Street posse. Also in a scene in the movie Domino.

Membership was originally restricted to Mexican nationals. Today, most members are of Mexican descent, but membership has opened to people of other backgrounds, including: African American, Middle Eastern, Asian American, and Native American. The gang has a loose hierarchical structure. Although the gang is well networked throughout the United States, and Mexico, there is no known central leadership nationally. Cliques generally function independently, but will join forces when combating rival gangs or police.

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Selita is Hot Wednesday, Apr 30 2008 

Lil Wayne’s On Fire, Tops ‘TRL’ & Billboard Hot 100 Wednesday, Apr 30 2008 

(more…)

Ivy Queen Visits Military School Wednesday, Apr 30 2008 

Ivy Queen visited a military school in Puerto Rico to talk to the students about following their dreams and inspire them in whatever they choose to do.

She said:

“I may not have graduated, but I have a degree magna cum laude from the streets, in which I graduated with honors.”

She then took questions from the kids and answered everything from her love life to her career.

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Andrea Serna & Claudia Bahamon en ElJugador Tuesday, Apr 29 2008 

Jery Sandoval en HD Tuesday, Apr 29 2008 

Jesus Christ is Really The Devil PT.1 Bobby Hemmitt Tuesday, Apr 29 2008 

Bobby Hemmitt “The (Gay) Hollywood” pt1 Tuesday, Apr 29 2008 

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